Real Issues Deserve Real Talk

Clients


 Photo by Janko Ferlič on Unsplash

Photo by Janko Ferlič on Unsplash

Youth (7-15) 

My favorite part of working with this age group is their brutal honesty. The world is complicated, and yet for them, there is often a simple solution. Problems in childhood often develop out of gaps in communication, perceived injustice, or adjusting to newfound autonomy and responsibility. I work with the client, the family, and the school to ensure that I have a clear understanding of the problem, and that whatever interventions we create are consistent across all domains. Common issues I work with in this age group are:

  • Defiant behavior
  • Aggressive tantrums/anger management issues
  • Parental divorce
  • Trauma/abuse
  • Depression/anxiety
  • Attachment issues
  • School issues/ADHD
  • Emotion regulation

 

 Photo by Zachary Nelson on Unsplash

Photo by Zachary Nelson on Unsplash

Emerging Adults (16-26)

There is a reason many serious mental health conditions emerge in the late teens and early twenties. As emerging adults enter into new academic or professional settings, new social circles, and/or new relationships, the values and beliefs we've held since childhood become challenged. We start to create a belief system separate of our family's, which can be profoundly uncomfortable for the individual and the family. Successfully navigating the transition from childhood into adulthood is a difficult feat, even for the least problematic of people. Navigating the transition and thinking about the rest of your life? That's an almost impossible task, especially if you feel like you have to do it on your own. Common issues I work with in this age group:

  • Self-esteem
  • Self-efficacy
  • Depression/Anxiety
  • Self-Injury/Cutting
  • College Transitions
  • Future Planning
  • Failure to launch

 

 Photo by  Edward Cisneros  on  Unsplash

Adults (27+)

My grandfather always told me, "Growing up isn't for sissies." He was right. There was no magical moment where it all clicked. There are times where we feel like children, and times where being an adult is an equally surreal experience. If I were to ask a room full of grown people to define "adulting," we wouldn't be able to form a consensus. "Adulting" doesn't have a singular definition. We all struggle with the: should haves, would haves, and could haves in our lives. We also all do the best we can. Common issues I work with in this age group are:

  • Depression/Anxiety
  • Self-loathing
  • Relationship issues/Uncoupling
  • Family or Co-parenting problems
  • Sexual issues
  • Grief
  • Anger
  • Feeling "Stuck"
 

Specialties

Sometimes it's hard to find therapists that specialize in the areas and communities you identify with. Here are a few areas I have targeted training and experience in...

 
 
 Photo by Dmitri Popov on Unsplash

Photo by Dmitri Popov on Unsplash

LGBTQIA+

More and more people are identifying outside of the heteronormative world I grew up in. Even so, it can be hard for individuals to disclose who they are attracted to, if they fit inside of the gender binary, or what they want going forward. Fear of rejection, discrimination, and isolation are real. Whether you need someone who can connect you to resources, view your other mental health issues through a queer lens, or be a sounding board and support, I take a non-judgemental, sex positive approach to your needs. I also work with LGBTQIA+ couples and families. 


Chronic Health

Taking care of your mental health when your body is battling against you is a particularly difficult task. Some days you wake up and you feel great. Others are inexplicably difficult. Battling a health condition can often take a toll on others as well. Families are impacted, often leaving the individual feeling like a burden. Relationships are impacted, often creating a desire discrepancy between partners. As the patient, everyone presents as if they are taking care of you, whether you asked for it or not. Often times, this actually means you are taking care of them.

Even processing or accepting the reality of the diagnosis is hard. What others may perceive as morbid, you just view as your reality or a new-normal. Things you need, others don't want to have to think about. It's an impossible position. However, you do not have to navigate it alone. I will help you find the solutions, balance, and acceptance that helps you make the most out of each day. 

 Photo by Janko Ferlič on Unsplash

Photo by Janko Ferlič on Unsplash


 Photo by Climate KIC on Unsplash

Photo by Climate KIC on Unsplash

High Achievers and Professionals

When you set the bar for yourself high, and others come to expect that from you, it quickly becomes a burnout role. No one can sustain being all things, to all people, all the time. While you are working diligently to prove that last line wrong, I bet you are also struggling with past disappointments and failures, self-esteem, and fear of the future. Whether we like it or not, the world keeps changing. The career you decided to start pursuing at 18 is no longer what you might want to do at 20, or 30, or 40. You weren't as successful as you wanted, or your grades weren't high enough, or you didn't get into an Ivy League school. 

Being the best, smart, and/or successful would not overtly indicate that you would benefit from therapy. However, if underneath it all, happiness is far and few between, you never feel like enough, and you're constantly stressed out, you might want to consider taking a different approach. I will help you pivot from your current course onto one that leverages your skills, talents, and drive in a more sustainable way. We will also work together to understand where the drive comes, overcome past disappointments, and redevelop your self-esteem.